Hand-washing: the do-it yourself vaccine

Safe water alone is not enough to stop water borne diseases, which is why we focus on hygiene and sanitation before we install the new well.

Our local partner, Village Water Zambia, leads training sessions on the link between poor practices and health and what actions people can take to improve this. Handwashing is vital as experts believe it could save more lives than any other single vaccine or medical intervention.

We ask every household to build a covered latrine with a tippy tap for hand-washing and to commit to ending open defecation.

“Even though I had a toilet I didn’t realise the importance of facilities such as the tippy tap for hand washing until after the training. I can now wash my hands after using the latrines. The tippy tap is my favourite sanitation facility”.
Mr Amuksana Mwangala, Senanga District
Hygiene & Sanitation
“Even though I had a toilet I didn’t realise the importance of facilities such as the tippy tap for hand washing until after the training. I can now wash my hands after using the latrines. The tippy tap is my favourite sanitation facility”.
Mr Amuksana Mwangala, Senanga District

Hand-washing: the do-it yourself vaccine

Safe water alone is not enough to stop water borne diseases, which is why we focus on hygiene and sanitation before we install the new well.
Our local partner, Village Water Zambia, leads training sessions on the link between poor practices and health and what actions people can take to improve this. Handwashing is vital as experts believe it could save more lives than any other single vaccine or medical intervention.
We ask every household to build a covered latrine with a tippy tap for hand-washing and to commit to ending open defecation.
am happy with the new model of latrine for I know that there will be no collapsing. The drums you have given us are holding the sand back. Thank you very much”.
Mrs Nosiku Mwala from Mongu District

Latrines that last

Village Water insists on an end to open defecation because the best health benefits come when people use a decent toilet, wash their hands and drink safe water.

This can be hard as latrines often collapse during annual floods, with open defecation being the only alternative. Thanks to funding from the UK Department for  International Development, we’ve been testing a reinforced latrine which we hope will last for many seasons, allowing families to enjoy uninterrupted use of their latrine.

Case study 7
am happy with the new model of latrine for I know that there will be no collapsing. The drums you have given us are holding the sand back. Thank you very much”.
Mrs Nosiku Mwala from Mongu District

Latrines that last

Village Water insists on an end to open defecation because the best health benefits come when people use a decent toilet, wash their hands and drink safe water.
This can be hard as latrines often collapse during annual floods, with open defecation being the only alternative. Thanks to funding from the UK Department for  International Development, we’ve been testing a reinforced latrine which we hope will last for many seasons, allowing families to enjoy uninterrupted use of their latrine.

Future generations

As Zambia’s population is very young, we are commited to working with school pupils, the next generation of parents, so that they understand the importance of good hygiene. They are encouraged to spread the word back in their communities.

School based training includes using a latrine instead of open defecation, washing hands at key times and drinking water from a protected source. One school has even come up with a great song called ‘Our Desire’ which we can’t stop singing in the office!

“We used to stay the whole day at school without washing hands, even after using the toilet. But, now tippy taps are placed at points where no pupil can ignore them, they have to wash their hands. We also go out into the villages teaching about the use of tippy taps. They are simple and everyone can afford to have and use one as it is designed for poor people“.
Itala Makalicha, pupil at Mongu District.
Hygiene & Sanitation
“We used to stay the whole day at school without washing hands, even after using the toilet. But, now tippy taps are placed at points where no pupil can ignore them, they have to wash their hands. We also go out into the villages teaching about the use of tippy taps. They are simple and everyone can afford to have and use one as it is designed for poor people“.
Itala Makalicha, pupil at Mongu District.

Future generations

As Zambia’s population is very young, we are commited to working with school pupils, the next generation of parents, so that they understand the importance of good hygiene. They are encouraged to spread the word back in their communities.
School based training includes using a latrine instead of open defecation, washing hands at key times and drinking water from a protected source. One school has even come up with a great song called ‘Our Desire’ which we can’t stop singing in the office!
“I thank Village Water for this approach that has changed my girls. There has been no girl absent from class this month yet”. 
Mrs Kashewe, the Grade 7 teacher (equivalent to UK Year 8)
I thought it was not normal for me to see blood on my underwear. Now, I do not go back home, here I am still in school”. 
Namushi Pumolo, 14 year old pupil

Removing other barriers to education

Many schools have no toilets or water source and girls miss school once they reach puberty, or even drop out altogether. We know it is vital to build adequate facilites and also to break down the stigma around menstruation.

We work with teachers, girls and boys on menstrual hygiene management, so everyone understands puberty, and it  really is working. At Sikundu School, pupils reported feeling much more confident in their knowledge and have made a commitment to change their attitudes. The school has also built a bath shelter for girls, giving them more privacy.

Hygiene & Sanitation
“I thank Village Water for this approach that has changed my girls. There has been no girl absent from class this month yet”. 
Mrs Kashewe, the Grade 7 teacher (equivalent to UK Year 8)
I thought it was not normal for me to see blood on my underwear. Now, I do not go back home, here I am still in school”. 
Namushi Pumolo, 14 year old pupil

Removing other barriers to education

Many schools have no toilets or water source and girls miss school once they reach puberty, or even drop out altogether. We know it is vital to build adequate facilites and also to break down the stigma around menstruation.
We work with teachers, girls and boys on menstrual hygiene management, so everyone understands puberty, and it  really is working. At Sikundu School, pupils reported feeling much more confident in their knowledge and have made a commitment to change their attitudes. The school has also built a bath shelter for girls, giving them more privacy.