We’re with Her #IDGC

 In News

We’re with Her #IDGC

Yesterday, International Day of the Girl Child was celebrated globally. Every day, our safe water projects empower young girls to dream big.

In rural Zambia and Mozambique, opportunities are limited and especially unbalanced for girls. Low-income families send one child to school: boys get an education whilst girls stay at home to collect water.

Menstruation is a taboo subject. Adolescent marriage and pregnancy is common, particularly among girls who are out-of-school. Girls are forced to use the bush as a toilet and wash in the river at night and are at risk of being physically or sexually assaulted.

Through safe water and sanitation, we are making sure that, firstly, girls basic needs are met. Safe water to drink at home means there’s less chance of getting sick, with more time and energy to go to school, learn and play. A private toilet and bath shelter means they’re safer.

Community hygiene education is breaking down damaging taboos. At home and school people tell us they’re glad to have a better understanding of menstruation because now they can better support their daughters and sisters.

With safe water, girls are able to fulfill their potential. And, with the right support and opportunities they can be whatever they want to be…

With safe water, 3-year-old Nalucha has a much brighter future to look forward to..

A donation of £30 could help one girl like Nalucha enjoy safe water and have a proper toilet and bath shelter at home, reducing the chances of diarrhoea so she can go to school.

Our safe water projects support the Sustainable Development Goals, including Goal #5: Gender Equality. Read more here.

We're with Her #IDGC

Yesterday, International Day of the Girl Child was celebrated globally. Every day, our safe water projects empower young girls to dream big.
In rural Zambia and Mozambique, opportunities are limited and especially unbalanced for girls. Low-income families send one child to school: boys get an education whilst girls stay at home to collect water.
Menstruation is a taboo subject. Adolescent marriage and pregnancy is common, particularly among girls who are out-of-school. Girls are forced to use the bush as a toilet and wash in the river at night and are at risk of being physically or sexually assaulted.
Through safe water and sanitation, we are making sure that, firstly, girls basic needs are met. Safe water to drink at home means there’s less chance of getting sick, with more time and energy to go to school, learn and play. A private toilet and bath shelter means they’re safer.
Community hygiene education is breaking down damaging taboos. At home and school people tell us they’re glad to have a better understanding of menstruation because now they can better support their daughters and sisters.
With safe water, girls are able to fulfill their potential. And, with the right support and opportunities they can be whatever they want to be…
With safe water, 3-year-old Nalucha has a much brighter future to look forward to..
A donation of £30 could help one girl like Nalucha enjoy safe water and have a proper toilet and bath shelter at home, reducing the chances of diarrhoea so she can go to school.
Our safe water projects support the Sustainable Development Goals, including Goal #5: Gender Equality. Read more here.
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