Working in
Partnership

Meet the men and women who are changing things in Africa

Working in
Partnership

Meet the men and women who are changing things in Africa

We build long-term relationships with our partners and help them grow into skilled, independent organisations. In return they are dedicated to implementing our projects on the ground. Read more about each of our partners below.

We build long-term relationships with our partners and help them grow into skilled, independent organisations. In return they are dedicated to implementing our projects on the ground. Read more about each of our partners below.

  • Village water Zambia
  • WATSAN Mozambique
  • Local Authorities
  • Manual Drilling Teams

Village Water Zambia (VWZ) began with 3 hard-working local people from Western Province way back in 2004.

Elisha Ng’onomo joined Founding Trustee David Dixon and other volunteers to repair the first 20 water points and he is still part of the team today, leading as Director since 2007.

Over the years we have helped the VWZ team grow, providing financial support, programme planning, board and staff development, recruitment and policies as well as training in financial and reporting systems. In 2007 they registered as an official Zambian NGO.

Some of the hardworking VWZ team: Mutinta, Matilda, Mampi, Stanley, Joseph, Happy, Ryles. March 2019.

VWZ has grown from a staff of 3 to 20, in three offices in Lusaka, Mongu and Kaoma. They have a great reputation in Zambia, where they are known as the ‘little giants’ due to their effective, professional and cost-effective work. They collaborate with local authorities to identify where the need is and to monitor the benefits of our joint projects.

The team are experts when it comes to work in their communities and deliver all our project activities on the ground in Zambia.

Our partnership in Mozambique began in the same vein as Village Water Zambia - a collaboration with passionate and knowledgeable local people, to address the desperate need for water and sanitation in-country.

We’ve worked with Blessing Njopera since our first days in Mozambique when he was leading the regional office of a large international organisation. In 2019, Blessing left to set up his own independent NGO, and WATSAN Mozambique was born.

Laura and Tabita are field officers for WATSAN Mozambique. Both women are passionate about helping their local community and ending water poverty in their home.

My aim is to work as hard as possible to help the projects to move forwards, in the creation of jobs and in development for the country (Mozambique).

I really care because there are so many more people who need our help

- Tabita, Field Officer
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Blessing Kasiwani, WASH Coordinator & Technician

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Paticai Matore,
Field Officer

We are so happy that we decided to support Blessing's new venture, as a truly local partner. Blessing’s years of experience in the field of water and sanitation, and our already well established and effective partnership to date makes us confident that WATSAN is the best team to run our projects in Mozambique.

Replicating the same successful model from Zambia, we will support Blessing and his team with extensive training and financial support and will continue to help the team grow.

The number of water points we fund grows year on year, so we’ve established a number of District Joint Monitoring Teams (DJMTs), comprising staff from the local council, the education authority and the Ministry of Health to support our projects by collecting data and case studies from communities to monitor the impact of the interventions over the long term.

DJMTs run hygiene and sanitation training, interview people, take photos and collect information on health, sanitation facilities and school attendance. They input the data onto mobile phones which is uploaded to our database, giving a real time picture of what’s happening, and flagging up if further support is needed.

Since 2011 we have invested in the professionalisation of manual drilling. Why? Because manual drilling is cheaper than using large mechanical rigs, far easier to transport and can reach families living in remote areas, and it is much safer than hand digging.

So far, we have supported 14 teams of local men and women, who, with varying degrees of experience in hand digging, were motivated to try a new skill. Now trained in hydro-geology, a variety of well construction technologies and in-depth business skills, the teams now carry out water-point installation for Village Water, among other clients. Many of the drillers have established their own enterprise, employing staff and are branching out into other construction activities, including latrines.

My life has changed since I became a manual driller because I have more money than ever before. I can feed my family every day and take them to school. I have managed to build a house through manual drilling. Those who never gave me respect before today they are giving me respect.

Davy Soopu, trained in 2012

Manual drilling was so well received in Western Province that the teams were invited by the Permanent Secretary for North Western Province to demonstrate the technology there.

Establishing professional enterprises means that the water points we install last. The teams train communities how to manage and maintain their new pump and can be contacted if more serious repairs are needed.

It also creates new income-generating opportunities, giving people the chance to improve their lives.
Feedback from 5 of our pilot trainees shows an 363% increase in their average income since 2011 and all of them said they felt happier and have a better quality of life since changing their job to manual drilling.

If that wasn’t enough, it also challenges gender stereotypes by inviting women to undergo training too. Gracious Sikalela was the first woman who joined the training programme, now she owns her own manual drilling business.

Read Gracious' story